‘Build Back, Baby’: Pete and Chasten Buttigieg celebrate Halloween in the hospital with their kids

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Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg dressed his twins as traffic cones to match their outfits with his talking points on infrastructure, as he and his family celebrated Halloween in the hospital with their ailing infant son.  

‘It is Halloween. Do the twins have a costume or costumes?’ CNN anchor Dana Bash asked him on Sunday.

‘So yeah, my husband Chasten found these… it’s a little hard to describe, but basically they’re like these traffic cones. They’re infrastructure. Basically they’re going to be going as infrastructure,’ Buttigieg replied.

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Buttigieg’s husband, Chasten Glazman, shared family pictures in a post on Instagram and also responded to a tweet from Fox News’ White House producer Pat Ward by writing ‘#BuildBackBaby’. 

In his Instagram post, Glazman suggested that son August ‘Gus’ Joseph had been unwell recently. 

‘As you can see, we’re spending this Halloween in the hospital. Gus has been having a rough go of it but we’re headed in the right direction,’ Glazman wrote. ‘We’re so thankful for all of the love and support shown to our family these last few months. And also, for the dedicated and kind medical professionals who have helped take care of our two little pumpkins as they’ve grown stronger, healthier, and cuter.’

Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg's dressed his children as traffic cones to represent infrastructure as he wanted to have their Halloween costumes be spot on with his talking points

Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg’s dressed his children as traffic cones to represent infrastructure as he wanted to have their Halloween costumes be spot on with his talking points

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Pete Buttigieg and husband Chasten Glazman shared their Halloween plans on Instagram, with Glazman hinting that son August 'Gus' Joseph is feeling unweel

Pete Buttigieg and husband Chasten Glazman shared their Halloween plans on Instagram, with Glazman hinting that son August ‘Gus’ Joseph is feeling unweel

Glazman Buttigieg shared a tweet in response to Fox News' White House producer Pat Ward tweet about his children's Halloween costumes with the hashtag '#BuildBackBaby' on Sunday

Glazman Buttigieg shared a tweet in response to Fox News’ White House producer Pat Ward tweet about his children’s Halloween costumes with the hashtag ‘#BuildBackBaby’ on Sunday

Buttigieg, 39, and Glazman welcomed twins Penelope Rose and Gus in August, and the Transportation boss has been criticized for taking extended paternity leave amid the nation’s supply chain crisis. 

‘Pete Buttigieg has been on leave from his job since August after adopting a child. Paternity leave, they call it, trying to figure out how to breastfeed. No word on how that went,’ Fox News’ Tucker Carlson complained.

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Buttigieg defended his need to take time off.

‘As you might imagine, we’re bottle feeding and doing it at all hours of the day and night,’ Buttigieg told Jake Tapper in a segment for CNN. ‘I’m not going to apologize to Tucker Carlson or anyone else for taking care of my premature newborn infant twins. The work that we are doing is joyful, fulfilling, wonderful work. It’s important work.’ 

Tucker Carlson has slammed Pete Buttigieg for taking paternity leave during a supply chain crisis as inflation soars in the US

Tucker Carlson has slammed Pete Buttigieg for taking paternity leave during a supply chain crisis as inflation soars in the US

Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg (right) and his husband Chasten welcome their twins to the world - Penelope Rose and Joseph August

Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg (right) and his husband Chasten welcome their twins to the world – Penelope Rose and Joseph August

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On Sunday, the former South Bend mayor made the talk show rounds and said that the supply chain crisis will continue at least until the COVID-19 pandemic ends amid fears of shortages ahead of the winter holidays.

‘There are definitely going to continue to be issues, especially as long as the pandemic continues,’ Buttigieg told Fox News Sunday. ‘If you have, for example, the third-largest container port in the world in China shutting down because of a COVID outbreak in late summer you’ll feel that in the fall here on the West coast.’

He said that while politicians, the ports, and industry executives are taking all the necessary steps to combat the supply crisis, catching up with the backlog will take time – particularly as consumer appetite for imported products grows.

‘Let’s remember: we are talking about global imbalances between demand – which is off the charts right now – and supply which is racing to keep up,’ Buttigieg said.

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‘…If we really want to see all of these disruptions end, we’ve got to end the pandemic. That’s what getting everybody vaccinated is all about.’

His comments came as the Los Angeles and Long Beach ports – which move about 40 percent of shipped cargo entering the U.S. – struggle with an historic backlog that’s slowing billions of dollars’ worth of consumer goods ahead of the holidays.

The Biden administration has come under fire for its ‘too little, too late’ response to the backlog after it announced West Coast shipping ports would be running around the clock to ease bottlenecks in the system.

Despite White House efforts, port officials have struggled to keep pace with the inflow of goods as tens of thousands of abandoned empty containers create congestion on land.

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Starting tomorrow, LA and Long Beach port will bill carriers $100 for each day each of their containers linger for prolonged amounts of time.

The fees will apply to containers that are sitting on the terminal for six days or more for units moving by rail, and nine days or more for goods moving by truck.

Transport Secretary Pete Buttigieg (right) told Fox News Sunday's Chris Wallace (left) that supply chain challenges will continue until the COVID-19 pandemic ends

Transport Secretary Pete Buttigieg (right) told Fox News Sunday’s Chris Wallace (left) that supply chain challenges will continue until the COVID-19 pandemic ends

The supply shortage has led to empty shelves ahead of the holidays. Barren shelves are seen October 26, 2021, in a Lakewood, Colorado, Target store

The supply shortage has led to empty shelves ahead of the holidays. Barren shelves are seen October 26, 2021, in a Lakewood, Colorado, Target store

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Buttigieg (right) told CNN's Dana Bash (left) that the pandemic is poking holes in supply, no matter how good any company or any administration is'

Buttigieg (right) told CNN’s Dana Bash (left) that the pandemic is poking holes in supply, no matter how good any company or any administration is’

During a Sunday interview with CNN’s Dana Bash, the transport secretary reiterated that the situation is unlikely to improve anytime soon.

‘The pandemic is poking holes in supply, no matter how good any company or any administration is,’ Buttigieg said.

‘We’re going to keep working on things like the port issues, smoothing out anything else that is within our control, but the only way we can really put these disruptions behind us is to put the pandemic in the rear-view mirror, which is why the president has been leading decisively to do just that.’

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Until then, the disruptions continue to wreak havoc on the nation’s supply chain.

Last week, toy giant Hasbro says supply chain disruptions prevented it from fulfilling $100million worth of toy orders during the third quarter. Hasbro’s chief financial officer Deborah Thomas said in an investor call that transit times have nearly doubled, and are as much as 50 days longer compared to pre-pandemic levels.

Amazon and Apple’s profits are hit by supply chain crunch.

Tens of thousands of empty containers at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach are further hampering efforts to move imported cargo to customers

Tens of thousands of empty containers at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach are further hampering efforts to move imported cargo to customers 

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Starting November 1, the ports will bill carriers $100 for each day their containers linger for prolonged amounts of time in an effort to incentivize shippers to move their empties

Starting November 1, the ports will bill carriers $100 for each day their containers linger for prolonged amounts of time in an effort to incentivize shippers to move their empties

Nearly empty shelves at New York City pharmacy and convenience store are seen October 26

Nearly empty shelves at New York City pharmacy and convenience store are seen October 26

Apple and Amazon on Thursday revealed disappointing results for their most recent quarters, as problems in the global supply chain began to be felt, and Apple’s chief executive said the shortages could sabotage Christmas gift plans.

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Apple chief executive Tim Cook said that his company’s lower-than-expected performance was due to a shortage of chips.

Customers seeking to buy new iPhones, iPads, Apple Watches and Mac models have found that the products will not be delivered until late November or even December – a situation that Cook earlier this month warned could be coming.

The third quarter marked the first time since April 2016 that Apple failed to beat earnings estimates, and the first time since May 2017 that Apple’s revenues have missed estimates, according to Refinitiv data.

‘We had a very strong performance despite larger than expected supply constraints, which we estimate to be around $6 billion,’ Cook told CNBC.

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‘The supply constraints were driven by the industry wide chip shortages that have been talked about a lot, and COVID-related manufacturing disruptions in Southeast Asia.’

Apple’s overall revenue was still up 29 per cent, to $83.36 billion – versus an estimate of $84.85 – and each of its product categories grew on an annual basis.

Amazon also saw its share price fall by 4 per cent on Thursday as they too announced worse than expected results.

Revenue in the third quarter rose 15 per cent, down from 37 per cent growth in the same period a year ago.

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The ports recorded a record vessel backup on October 24, when 110 ships were at anchor

The ports recorded a record vessel backup on October 24, when 110 ships were at anchor 

There were 103 container ships in the LA and Long Beach ports on Wednesday

There were 103 container ships in the LA and Long Beach ports on Wednesday

The disappointing result was due to people returning to shops, post-pandemic, and relying less on Amazon for their purchases, said CEO Andy Jassy.

Jassy, 53, took over from Amazon’s founder Jeff Bezos in July.

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He warned investors that issues in the global supply chain and the lingering impact of the pandemic would also be felt in their next quarter.

Jassy said the company expects to take on ‘several billion dollars’ of extra costs in its consumer business in the fourth quarter as a result of labor shortages, higher employee costs, global supply chain constraints and increased freight and shipping costs.

The delivery slowdown is largely being blamed on the receiving end on tens of thousands of empty shipping containers that have accumulated on deck.

California’s San Pedro Bay ports are aiming to move 40 percent of stranded containers by today to help expediate the flow of goods.

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‘Santa’s going to need a little extra help this year,’ Port of Long Beach chief operating officer Noel Hacegaba told DailyMail.com last Wednesday. ‘We recognize that 40 percent is a big number, and it will require an unprecedented, coordinated effort, but it must be done.’

Buttigieg also has been a key figure in recent efforts to push infrastructure forward in Congress. 

For months, the Biden administration has been pushing to pass a $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill, focusing on modernizing roads, bridges and transit systems while expanding high-speed internet systems and the country’s number of electric vehicle charging stations. 

The bill – one of the Biden administration’s top priorities – was voted to go through the Senate in August in an overwhelming bipartisan vote, 69-30, after months of debate.

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However, the bill is pending a vote in the House and leaders within the Democrats are pushing back against it without agreement on a larger $1.85trillion social and climate spending package, which could go through as soon as Tuesday.


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