Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors. Please consider supporting us by whitelisting our website.

Eric Adams says NYC has become ‘a laughingstock’ amid skyrocketing crime

Eric Adams says NYC has become 'a laughingstock' amid skyrocketing crime 2

New Mayor Eric Adams said the spike in crime across New York City has made the Big Apple a ‘laughingstock’ in need of a ‘wartime general’ to tackle the ongoing problem.

Adams, speaking at the annual NYPD Holy Name Society communion Mass and breakfast on Sunday, condemned the lawlessness throughout the city and blamed petty crime and homelessness as contributing factors to the widespread ‘dysfunction.’  

Advertisement

‘Anything goes in the City of New York,’ Adams said, according to The New York Post. ‘The most important city on the globe has become the laughingstock of the globe. And the dysfunctionality of our city has cascaded throughout the entire country.’

The mayor’s commentary came just two days after he blamed the city’s shooting surge for the massive months-long drop in traffic enforcement. 

His push to combat crime also comes as the NYPD’s February crime statistics showed an almost 60 percent increase in felonies compared to the same time last year and a recent poll of more than 9,000 employees revealed that 40 percent of those working in Manhattan wanted to move away due to rising crime. About 48 percent of those working in the other four boroughs agreed.  

Advertisement
New Mayor Eric Adams said the spike in crime across New York City has made the Big Apple a 'laughingstock' in need of a 'wartime general' to tackle the ongoing problem

New Mayor Eric Adams said the spike in crime across New York City has made the Big Apple a ‘laughingstock’ in need of a ‘wartime general’ to tackle the ongoing problem

'Anything goes in the city of New York,' Adams said Sunday at the annual NYPD Holy Name Society communion mass and breakfast. The event was attended by 500 police officers

‘Anything goes in the city of New York,’ Adams said Sunday at the annual NYPD Holy Name Society communion mass and breakfast. The event was attended by 500 police officers

During Sunday’s speech at the Midtown Hilton, Adams cited two separate Brooklyn shootings from last week that left children, ages seven and three, injured. 

Advertisement

‘It’s just not OK to leave a daycare center with your baby and hear gunshots, or walk across Kings Highway with your 7-year-old and hear shots,’ Adams said at the annual mass and breakfast at the Midtown Hilton.

He called on the nearly 500 police offers in attendance to reclaim the streets of NYC, arguing the ‘people want their city back’. 

‘Don’t let anyone break your spirit, tell you that New Yorkers don’t love the men and women of the NYPD,’ the mayor reportedly said. ‘Everywhere I go they say, ‘Protect our police.’ Ignore the noise. Ignore Instagram, social media. Facebook.

Advertisement

‘Ignore all of that because the people of the city are watching. The people of their city want their city back.’

Adams called on the police offers in attendance to reclaim the streets of NYC, arguing the 'people want their city back'. He also likened himself to a wartime general, alleging that he would do everything in his power to support police and boost morale

Adams called on the police offers in attendance to reclaim the streets of NYC, arguing the ‘people want their city back’. He also likened himself to a wartime general, alleging that he would do everything in his power to support police and boost morale

The mayor's push to combat crime also comes as the NYPD's February crime statistics showed an almost 60 percent increase in felonies compared to the same time last year (Pictured: Police responding to a shooting at Avenue D and E23rd Street in Brooklyn on March 12)

The mayor’s push to combat crime also comes as the NYPD’s February crime statistics showed an almost 60 percent increase in felonies compared to the same time last year (Pictured: Police responding to a shooting at Avenue D and E23rd Street in Brooklyn on March 12)

Advertisement

Adams also likened himself to a wartime general, saying he would do everything in his power to support police and boost morale. 

‘There are wartime and peacetime generals. I’m a wartime general,’ he said. ‘I’m going to be on the front line. Those of you in transit, I’m in the subway system at 2, 3 a.m. with you. I’m going to your precincts. I’m going to call you up when you make those arrests.

‘I’m not sending you to the front line and leaving you there,’ he added. ‘I’m going to be at the front line with you. I’m going to lead you into battle.’

Advertisement

The mayor also reiterated he was willing to take bold risks in fighting crime, not just instruct citizens to follow the rules.

‘The audacity that someone comes along and says, “I want to be your mayor,” and simply says, “Follow the rules, follow the rules,”‘ he said.

‘Let’s acknowledge that the heat is being turned up. We want to turn it down so we don’t watch our city boil to death.’    

Advertisement
Sunday's remarks followed a similar sentiment Adams expressed Friday in Brooklyn (pictured) after being questioned about statistics showing NYPD officers are issuing traffic summonses at a rate of less than half it did pre-pandemic

Sunday’s remarks followed a similar sentiment Adams expressed Friday in Brooklyn (pictured) after being questioned about statistics showing NYPD officers are issuing traffic summonses at a rate of less than half it did pre-pandemic

Adams on Friday blamed the city's shooting surge for the massive months-long drop in traffic enforcement (Pictured: Police responding to the fatal shooting of a homeless man in Tribeca on March 13)

Adams on Friday blamed the city’s shooting surge for the massive months-long drop in traffic enforcement (Pictured: Police responding to the fatal shooting of a homeless man in Tribeca on March 13)

Sunday’s remarks followed a similar sentiment Adams expressed Friday in Brooklyn after being questioned about statistics showing NYPD officers are issuing traffic summonses at a rate of less than half it did pre-pandemic.

Advertisement

‘We have to do a better job,’ he told The New York Post before attributing the lack of traffic enforcement to the city’s violent crime surge. 

‘As you know, we have been dealing with a real crisis of gun violence — 29 people shot in a short period of time last week.’

‘But we’re going to get our traffic enforcement personnel involved and send a real message out to all of our police commanders that public safety includes vehicle crashes.’ 

Advertisement

According to the news outlet, NYPD issued only 83,000 traffic summons during the first two months of 2022, a 54 percent decrease from the 182,000 summons issued during the first two months of 2019.

Police statistics also showed a surge in traffic-related deaths. Forth-six pedestrians, cyclists and motorists died in traffic incidents during January and February 2022.

The traffic-related death rate is the highest the city has seen in at least the last six years.  It’s the highest in at least the last six years.

Advertisement

Adams has also joined local lawmakers in demanding that state leaders renew and expand laws that would allow city officials to operate traffic law enforcement cameras. The law is currently set to expire this summer. 

Additionally, the proposed legislation would allow 24-hour operation of speed cameras in school zones, instead of the current hours of 6am to 10pm. 

It would also permit the city to install red light cameras at 1,325 intersections, a significant increase from NYC’s current 150 cameras.  

Advertisement
'We have to do a better job,' Adams said Friday about the city's violent crime surge, citing the gun violence crisis which left 29 dead last week (Pictured: Officers respond to a shooting in Brooklyn on January 31)

‘We have to do a better job,’ Adams said Friday about the city’s violent crime surge, citing the gun violence crisis which left 29 dead last week (Pictured: Officers respond to a shooting in Brooklyn on January 31)

On Sunday, Adams reiterated he was willing to take bold risks in fighting crime, not just instruct citizens to follow the rules (Pictured: A homeless person was found dead on Murray Street in Manhattan on March 13)

On Sunday, Adams reiterated he was willing to take bold risks in fighting crime, not just instruct citizens to follow the rules (Pictured: A homeless person was found dead on Murray Street in Manhattan on March 13)

Adams said Sunday that the 'heat is being turned up' and  'we want to turn it down so we don't watch our city boil to death' (Pictured: Police responding to a shooting at Avenue D and E23rd Street in Brooklyn on March 12)

Adams said Sunday that the ‘heat is being turned up’ and  ‘we want to turn it down so we don’t watch our city boil to death’ (Pictured: Police responding to a shooting at Avenue D and E23rd Street in Brooklyn on March 12)

Advertisement

Meanwhile, New Yorkers working in Manhattan are so fed up with rampant crime that 40 percent said they want to leave the Empire State – with eight out of 10 people saying the Big Apple has gone to hell, according to a recent poll. 

The Morning Consult poll, conducted for Partnership for New York, surveyed 9,386 adults working in New York City from February 17 to March 11, with many voicing their frustration over the soaring crime and homelessness that has gripped the streets and subways. 

According to the poll, 74 percent of respondents said that safety has gotten worse in the city since the start of the pandemic lockdowns in March 2020, with 82 percent saying homelessness has also worsened. 

Advertisement

Overall, 84 percent of respondents said conditions in the city have gotten worse over the past two years, with more than half agreeing that conditions have greatly deteriorated. 

‘Safety, homelessness, and mental illness rank as top issues for New York City’s private sector employees,’ Morning Consult wrote in its findings to Partnership, whose more than 300 members employ more than 1 million people in the city. ‘They are resisting return to the office until something is done to address them, particularly on public transit.’ 

In all, 40 percent of those who live in Manhattan want to move away while 48 percent who live in the other four boroughs are also looking for an exit plan. 

Advertisement

The poll results come as New York City is experiencing a major crime surge, with the New York Police Department’s February crime statistics showing an almost 60 percent increase in felonies compared to the same time last year.  

New York City workers said they were fed up with the rise in crime and homelessness in the city, according to a recent poll of more than 9,000 employees. Of those polled, 84 percent said conditions in the city have worsened in the last two years

New York City workers said they were fed up with the rise in crime and homelessness in the city, according to a recent poll of more than 9,000 employees. Of those polled, 84 percent said conditions in the city have worsened in the last two years

About 40 percent of those working in Manhattan wanted to move away due to rising crime (left) while 48 percent of those working in the other four boroughs agreed (right)

About 40 percent of those working in Manhattan wanted to move away due to rising crime (left) while 48 percent of those working in the other four boroughs agreed (right)

Advertisement
About 74 percent of respondents said that safety has gotten worse in the city since the start of the pandemic in March 2020, with 82 percent saying homelessness has also worsened

About 74 percent of respondents said that safety has gotten worse in the city since the start of the pandemic in March 2020, with 82 percent saying homelessness has also worsened

Overall crime in the city is up more than 45 percent since the same period last year

Overall crime in the city is up more than 45 percent since the same period last year

Meantime, crime in the Big Apple doesn’t appear to be slowing down any time soon. 

Advertisement

The New York subway has been ground zero, after an alarming 73.3 percent increase in underground incidents – including 182 in February alone.

Hate crimes also have doubled since last year — with anti-Asian attacks more than tripling and anti-Semitic attacks complaints up by a whopping 54 percent over the same time last year, from 134 to 207 incidents.

Overall crime in the city is up more than 45 percent since last year, with 4,736 felony assaults reported so far this year compared to 4,003 last year, a more than 18 percent spike. 

Advertisement

Robberies saw the largest uptick with 3,351 cases report so far, a 45.6 percent rise from last year. 

Rapes have also seen a dramatic spike with 360 cases reported compared to 247 during the same time last year, a nearly 31 percent jump. 

The number of shooting victims continues to go up as 284 cases were reported so far this year, a 17.4 percent increase.  

Advertisement

About The Author