First jet deporting migrants to Rwanda could be delayed to next year over human rights concerns

First jet deporting migrants to Rwanda could be delayed to next year over human rights concerns 2
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First jet deporting migrants to Rwanda could be delayed until NEXT YEAR after hearing is put back over human rights concerns

  • Barristers have delayed the first Rwanda flight to November – or even next year
  • Campaigners are contesting policy of deporting ‘irregular’ refugees to Rwanda
  • Judicial review delayed as barristers fighting the Home Office raise human rights
  • Report released yesterday said Border Force ‘escorting’ illegal migrants to Dover
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Immigration barristers have delayed the first asylum seekers’ flight to Rwanda until November – and possibly next year.

A number of charities, a trade union, and individual migrants who crossed the Channel by dinghy or hidden in lorries, are together contesting the policy of deporting ‘irregular’ refugees to Rwanda.

Those who arrive by clandestine means are supposed to be flown to Africa to seek asylum there.

But a ruling in June by a single night duty judge at the European Court of Human Rights halted the first flight.

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Yesterday, the High Court judges hearing the case at London's Royal Courts of Justice ruled that the challenges to the flights will be heard at two hearings, the first in September and the second in mid-October. Pictured: Protesters against deporting asylum seekers to Rwanda outside the Royal Courts of Justice in June

Yesterday, the High Court judges hearing the case at London’s Royal Courts of Justice ruled that the challenges to the flights will be heard at two hearings, the first in September and the second in mid-October. Pictured: Protesters against deporting asylum seekers to Rwanda outside the Royal Courts of Justice in June

A judicial review of the policy was due to conclude today but barristers fighting the Home Office successfully adjourned the hearing after raising fresh concerns over human rights.

Yesterday, the High Court judges hearing the case at London’s Royal Courts of Justice ruled that the challenges to the flights will be heard at two hearings, the first in September and the second in mid-October.

The judgments will be delivered together, possibly weeks later.

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Even if the rulings are in favour of the Government scheme, appeals could then push back the first flight to 2023.

  • The Border Force is ‘escorting’ illegal migrants to the UK, a report found yesterday. Alexander Downer, the former Australian immigration minister, reviewed the British security body and found it is ‘effectively rescuing’ migrants in small boats. His 60-page report said the Government should turn boats around ‘when it is safe and legal to do so’.
People thought to be migrants crossing from France to Dover in small boats that were picked up in the Channel by the British Border Force in June

People thought to be migrants crossing from France to Dover in small boats that were picked up in the Channel by the British Border Force in June

Channel drone is catch of the day 

A fisherman had an unusual catch after a hi-tech drone designed to scour the Channel for migrants ‘malfunctioned’.

The 5ft-long Tekever AR with an 11ft wingspan should be able to stay airborne for 16 hours. It costs £420,000, according to The Sun.

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It was towed to port, as figures revealed more than 15,000 small boat migrants have already crossed to Britain this year.

The skipper declined to comment, but a Dover local said: ‘He found the drone floating in the sea and tied it to his boat and brought it back to harbour.’

The Home Office said it was aware of an incident involving a drone on July 5 and added: ‘It was recovered and the malfunction has since been corrected.’

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