How 12 excruciating minutes meant Bert Newton died alone and without his wife Patti by his side

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Bert Newton's beloved wife Patti revealed she missed his death by 12 excruciating minutes after leaving his hospital bed on Saturday

Bert Newton’s beloved wife Patti revealed she missed his death by 12 excruciating minutes after leaving his hospital bed on Saturday 

Bert Newton’s beloved wife Patti has revealed she missed his death by 12 excruciating minutes, but believes the Australian TV legend hadn’t wanted her to see his final breath.

The entertainment icon, 83, died in his hospital bed on Saturday night after a long battle with a number of illnesses, including a toe infection that saw his leg amputated from the knee down.

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Patti, supported by granddaughters Eva and Lola outside their Melbourne home, revealed Bert passed away some 12 minutes after she left him that evening – waiting so she didn’t watch him die in a last moment of selflessness from her husband of 47 years. 

‘I left [the clinic where Bert was in palliative care] at ten past seven, and I was just pulling around to come into my drive and I get the call to say he’d taken his last breath at 7.22pm,’ she said. 

‘I missed him, but maybe he didn’t want me to be there for his last breath. 

‘It’s very, very devastating. All our hearts are breaking because he was just the most wonderful man.’

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Grief-stricken Patti Newton is seen for the first time since her husband Bert's tragic death aged 83 following a long health battle

Grief-stricken Patti Newton is seen for the first time since her husband Bert’s tragic death aged 83 following a long health battle

Speaking for the first time since the TV legend's death, Patti (pictured) said she was notified of his passing shortly after leaving his bedside on Saturday night

Speaking for the first time since the TV legend’s death, Patti (pictured) said she was notified of his passing shortly after leaving his bedside on Saturday night

Boxing legend Muhammad Ali plants a kiss on Bert Newton's cheek at the Logie Awards in 1979. Both have since passed away, Newton on Saturday night while Ali died in 2016

Boxing legend Muhammad Ali plants a kiss on Bert Newton’s cheek at the Logie Awards in 1979. Both have since passed away, Newton on Saturday night while Ali died in 2016

The 76-year-old said Bert ‘just couldn’t do it anymore’, but believed he didn’t want her to watch him go.  

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‘He had such a fabulous attitude. And he gave us so much joy right up to the end,’ she revealed.

‘His year was not only tough health-wise, but mentally he had a lot to cope with.’

Bert had his leg amputated earlier this year after a toe infection that led to another range of complications. 

The former singer and dancer said he held his humour until the end, regularly saying he could replace current stars on their respective shows. 

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‘All he could talk about was things that he had in mind,’ she said. ‘”I’d be good at that, I wonder how I’d go at doing Eddie’s show if ever he wants to take a break.”

‘I used to laugh, because I’d think “you’re 83, you’ve got one leg, how would you go up and down the stairs?”

‘But I love that attitude of his, he was never going to give up and that’s what we have to take with us, don’t we girls?

‘We have to just make sure that the love he gave us stays with us forever.’     

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Patti emerged from her Melbourne home, just hours after the shock announcement that Bert passed away having suffered a long health battle which led to one of his legs being amputated

Patti emerged from her Melbourne home, just hours after the shock announcement that Bert passed away having suffered a long health battle which led to one of his legs being amputated

The TV personality is survived by his wife of 47 years Patti, his two children Lauren and Matthew, and six grandchildren

The TV personality is survived by his wife of 47 years Patti, his two children Lauren and Matthew, and six grandchildren

Patti, who was married to Bert for 47 years, said she hoped her late husband ‘will be remembered for legend that he was’. 

She said the family was struggling to cope with the loss, with granddaughters Lola and Eva particularly distraught.

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‘It’s hard. It’s hard for this age group Lauren and Eva were out to dinner last night, just having a quick little girls’ meal. And I rang and poor Eva had to come, she didn’t go in, we felt that was too much for her,’ she explained.

‘I can’t get that out of my mind, really, but I have to think that he’s at peace and he’s not in pain. Eva and Lola, both the loves of his life.’

Bert Newton (left) smiles with 'The King' Graham Kennedy (right). The pair are two of the most recognisable faces in the country's entertainment history

Bert Newton (left) smiles with ‘The King’ Graham Kennedy (right). The pair are two of the most recognisable faces in the country’s entertainment history

Hours later, Patti's daughter Lauren and two of her children were seen arriving at the family's home to comfort her

Hours later, Patti’s daughter Lauren and two of her children were seen arriving at the family’s home to comfort her

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Bert Newton kisses Rove McManus at the telethon raising money for the victims of the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami

Bert Newton kisses Rove McManus at the telethon raising money for the victims of the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami

According to a report in Confidential on Sunday, an alleged insider claimed it's 'unlikely' Matthew will fly home to Australia (pictured with his father)

According to a report in Confidential on Sunday, an alleged insider claimed it’s ‘unlikely’ Matthew will fly home to Australia (pictured with his father) 

Bert’s troubled son Matthew, 44, moved to New York in 2012 after battling a series of mental illnesses and addictions while being involved in a number of incidents.

According to a report in Confidential on Sunday, an insider claimed it’s ‘unlikely’ he will fly home to Australia to be alongside his family as they deal with the death of his father.  

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The actor and director, who suffers from bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder and has a history of addiction, has a notably tumultuous past. 

This includes domestic violence allegations from two former girlfriends, Australian actresses Brooke Satchwell, 40, and Rachael Taylor, 37. 

Matthew was also arrested twice in Miami, Florida, in 2012 – the first for trespassing and resisting officers, while a second incident saw him charged with battery and resisting arrest after he attacked a hotel receptionist.

The actor and director, who suffers from bipolar disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder and has a history of addiction, has a notably tumultuous past (pictured in 2001)

The actor and director, who suffers from bipolar disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder and has a history of addiction, has a notably tumultuous past (pictured in 2001) 

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Matthew has seen domestic violence allegations from two former girlfriends: Australian actresses Brooke Satchwell, 40, and Rachael Taylor, 37 (pictured)

Matthew has seen domestic violence allegations from two former girlfriends: Australian actresses Brooke Satchwell, 40, and Rachael Taylor, 37 (pictured)

Following the charges, Matthew checked into the Betty Ford Center in California for 90 days of alcohol and drug treatment.  

Matthew has stayed under the radar since relocating to the US and reportedly resisted requests from his mother to return to Australia last year, when New York was struggling through the worst of the Covid-19 pandemic.   

He was forced to withdraw as director of the Hollywood film Eve in October 2018 after a social media backlash over his alleged history of assault. 

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According to Woman’s Day magazine, Matthew has permanently given up on his home country and is happy living with long-term partner Catherine Schneiderman in New York. 

'I left [the clinic where Bert was in palliative care] at ten past seven, and I was just pulling around to come into my drive and I get the call to say he'd taken his last breath at 7.22pm,' she said

‘I left [the clinic where Bert was in palliative care] at ten past seven, and I was just pulling around to come into my drive and I get the call to say he’d taken his last breath at 7.22pm,’ she said

Premier Daniel Andrews issued a statement following the news of his death, saying the TV icon (pictured) will 'live on in the memories of an entire generation', and said a state funeral will be held

Premier Daniel Andrews issued a statement following the news of his death, saying the TV icon (pictured) will ‘live on in the memories of an entire generation’, and said a state funeral will be held

'It's very, very devastating. All our hearts are breaking because he was just the most wonderful man,' his wife Patti (pictured) said

‘It’s very, very devastating. All our hearts are breaking because he was just the most wonderful man,’ his wife Patti (pictured) said

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Premier Daniel Andrews issued a statement following the news of the comic legend’s death, saying the TV icon will ‘live on in the memories of an entire generation’, and that a state funeral will be held. 

‘Bert Newton was an icon, a larrikin and a born entertainer. We have never known TV without Bert – he was there from the beginning. From black and white to colour – as TV changed, Bert endured,’ he said.

‘He lived his life on the silver screen — and we welcomed his wit and humour into our homes.

‘As we reflect on his legacy in the coming days, we’ll all be reminded of his legendary partnerships with Graham Kennedy and Don Lane. For so many, those partnerships are as inseparable as they are memorable.

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‘He brought the Logies to life during TV’s golden era. And while TV was always his anchor, Bert was also a star on radio and the stage — performing in some of our most iconic musicals including Phantom of the Opera and the Rocky Horror Picture Show among others.

‘But above all his achievements, he was a family man and his greatest partnership was with his wife of almost 50 years, Patti. Our thoughts and prayers are with her, their children and their grandchildren.

‘We will all have an opportunity to honour his memory, his talent and his achievements at a state funeral – details will be shared in the coming days. Bert will live on in the memories of an entire generation. Gone, but never forgotten. Vale Bert Newton.’ 

Newton hosted The Annual TV Week Logie Awards for the first time in 1968, and would go on to host the prestigious ceremony a total of 19 times

Newton hosted The Annual TV Week Logie Awards for the first time in 1968, and would go on to host the prestigious ceremony a total of 19 times

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His daughter Lauren carried her young son Alby as she held her daughter's hand after visiting the family home on Sunday morning

His daughter Lauren carried her young son Alby as she held her daughter’s hand after visiting the family home on Sunday morning

Patti, who was married to Bert for 47 years, said she hoped her late husband 'will be remembered for legend that he was'

Patti, who was married to Bert for 47 years, said she hoped her late husband ‘will be remembered for legend that he was’

The service will most likely be held at Bert’s ‘beloved’ St Pat’s Cathedral in Melbourne. 

Bert’s health first became a concern in 2012 when he underwent a quadruple bypass.

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In the years following the surgery, the four-time Logie winner was hospitalised three times with pneumonia and was also diagnosed with anaemia.

Bert was hospitalised in March and underwent surgery on his leg in May. He needed surgery after his toe became infected before Christmas.

The infection was ‘linked to his diabetes’ and was threatening his life with doctors telling him the surgery was a ‘life or death decision’.

Doctors reportedly told Bert that if he kept the leg then he would have just ‘months to live’ rather than years if he chose to amputate. 

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Lauren Newton returns to her car after visiting mother Patti's home on Sunday morning following the death of her father Bert aged 83

Lauren Newton returns to her car after visiting mother Patti’s home on Sunday morning following the death of her father Bert aged 83

Lauren's husband, former Olympian husband Matt Welsh, was seen delivering food to the family on Sunday

Lauren’s husband, former Olympian husband Matt Welsh, was seen delivering food to the family on Sunday

Bert has been in the entertainment industry since age 11, when he started appearing on radio station 3XY in 1950.

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He continued doing ad reads for the station throughout high school, and eventually dropped out of school to work there as a DJ.

He made the leap to television in 1957, just one year after the launch of commercial television in Australia.

With a showbiz career spanning across eight decades, Newton was the last remaining link between the dawn of Aussie television and today’s industry.

His first major gig on the small screen was as the host of The Late Show from 1957 to 1959.

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He then jumped over to rival network Nine and formed a friendship and partnership with Graham Kennedy.

He quickly became Kennedy’s loveable sidekick and the pair worked together across various shows for almost fifteen years.

Bert Newton's beloved wife Patti (pictured together) revealed she missed his death by 12 excruciating minutes after leaving his hospital bed on Saturday

Bert Newton’s beloved wife Patti (pictured together) revealed she missed his death by 12 excruciating minutes after leaving his hospital bed on Saturday

Newton hosted The Annual TV Week Logie Awards for the first time in 1968, and would go on to host the prestigious ceremony a total of 19 times.

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He was also awarded the coveted Gold Logie four times.

One of his most popular roles was as the host of the wildly successful talent show New Faces, from 1976 to 1985. 

In his later years, he became best known for hosting Good Morning Australia from 1993 to 2005 and Nine’s 20 to 1 from 2006 to 2011.

Throughout his career, he was affectionally known by fans and the general public as ‘Moonface’.

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He got the iconic nickname during his time on The Don Lane Show in the 70s.

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