Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors. Please consider supporting us by whitelisting our website.

Jennifer Aniston shares she suffers from insomnia and has in the past sleepwalked

Jennifer Aniston shares she suffers from insomnia and has in the past sleepwalked 2

Jennifer Aniston reveals she has been suffering from insomnia since 30 and she used to even sleepwalk: ‘The more I worry the harder it is to fall asleep!’

Jennifer Aniston revealed she often has insomnia.

The 53-year-old actress has suffered from sleep problems for decades and admitted to People that she often she worries she won’t be able to fall asleep, causing stress at night. 

‘I dread spending another night counting cracks in the walls,’ said the Morning Show actress. ‘I think it started somewhere in my 30s or even earlier, but you just don’t start to notice the effects of a lack of sleep when we’re younger because we’re so invincible.’

An issue: Jennifer Aniston revealed she often has insomnia. The 53-year-old actress has suffered from sleep problems for decades and admitted that she often she worries she won't be able to fall asleep, causing stress at night. Seen in 2020

An issue: Jennifer Aniston revealed she often has insomnia. The 53-year-old actress has suffered from sleep problems for decades and admitted that she often she worries she won’t be able to fall asleep, causing stress at night. Seen in 2020

She added, ‘It began as something that I would just accept and then all of a sudden you realize the effects of your lack of sleep and how it affects your day and your work and your mind function and your physique.’

The former Friends star went on to explain that the more she ‘worries’ about falling asleep, the harder it is to do so and revealed that in the past she would even sleepwalk.

She told People: ‘And the more I worry about it, the harder it is to fall asleep.

Young time: 'I dread spending another night counting cracks in the walls,' said the Morning Show actress. 'I think it started somewhere in my 30s or even earlier, but you just don't start to notice the effects of a lack of sleep when we're younger because we're so invincible.' Seen in 2000 when she was 31

Young time: ‘I dread spending another night counting cracks in the walls,’ said the Morning Show actress. ‘I think it started somewhere in my 30s or even earlier, but you just don’t start to notice the effects of a lack of sleep when we’re younger because we’re so invincible.’ Seen in 2000 when she was 31

Toned: In the 2011 film Just Go With it. She added: 'It became something that I really was struggling with. It used to be the last thing on the list, but you can't really abide by the three pillars of health — which are diet, exercise and sleep — if you can't really exercise and you can't really eat right if you haven't slept well because your body clock is so completely thrown off'

Toned: In the 2011 film Just Go With it. She added: ‘It became something that I really was struggling with. It used to be the last thing on the list, but you can’t really abide by the three pillars of health — which are diet, exercise and sleep — if you can’t really exercise and you can’t really eat right if you haven’t slept well because your body clock is so completely thrown off’

‘I have been known to [sleepwalk]. I’ve been woken up by house alarms going off that I’ve set off. 

WHAT IS INSOMNIA? 

According to webmd,’ Insomnia is a sleep disorder in which you have trouble falling and/or staying asleep. 

‘The condition can be short-term (acute) or can last a long time (chronic). It may also come and go. 

‘Acute insomnia lasts from 1 night to a few weeks. Insomnia is chronic when it happens at least 3 nights a week for 3 months or more.’

There are two types of insomnia: primary and secondary.

Primary insomnia: This means your sleep problems aren’t linked to any other health condition or problem.

Secondary insomnia: This means you have trouble sleeping because of a health condition (like asthma, depression, arthritis, cancer, or heartburn); pain; medication; or substance use (like alcohol).

‘And I don’t think I do that anymore — that was when I was super sleep deprived. The body is saying, “Now don’t go out and set the alarm off again, okay?”‘

Jennifer – who is thought to have sought medical help for her sleeping problems – explained that it became hard to keep herself healthy because a lack of sleep prevented her from being able to exercise.

She added: ‘It became something that I really was struggling with.

‘It used to be the last thing on the list, but you can’t really abide by the three pillars of health — which are diet, exercise and sleep — if you can’t really exercise and you can’t really eat right if you haven’t slept well because your body clock is so completely thrown off.’

According to webmd,’ Insomnia is a sleep disorder in which you have trouble falling and/or staying asleep. 

‘The condition can be short-term (acute) or can last a long time (chronic). It may also come and go. 

‘Acute insomnia lasts from 1 night to a few weeks. Insomnia is chronic when it happens at least 3 nights a week for 3 months or more.

‘There are two types of insomnia: primary and secondary.

‘Primary insomnia: This means your sleep problems aren’t linked to any other health condition or problem.

‘Secondary insomnia: This means you have trouble sleeping because of a health condition (like asthma, depression, arthritis, cancer, or heartburn); pain; medication; or substance use (like alcohol). 

Aniston has been in Paris shooting Murder Mystery 2 with pal Adam Sandler.

The siren has said that they wrapped recently for the Netflix sequel. 

Worries a lot: The former Friends star went on to explain that the more she 'worries' about falling asleep, the harder it is to do so and revealed that in the past she would even sleepwalk. Seen in 2017

Worries a lot: The former Friends star went on to explain that the more she ‘worries’ about falling asleep, the harder it is to do so and revealed that in the past she would even sleepwalk. Seen in 2017

Advertisement

About The Author