Suella Braverman signals shake-up of how police log burglary cases

Suella Braverman signals shake-up of how police log burglary cases 2
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Suella Braverman signals shake-up of how police log burglary cases after forces pledge to send officers to every break-in

  • Miss Braverman signals review  of how burglaries are reported so officers can be on streets, not pushing paper
  •  All 43 police chiefs made pledge to send officers to every residential burglary
  •  National Police Chiefs’ Council Martin Hewitt plans to tear up the bureaucratic process officers have to follow when a crime report comes in
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The Home Secretary signalled a major shake-up in the way burglary is treated by the police yesterday after force chiefs agreed to send an officer to every home raid.

Suella Braverman said she would review the way burglary is recorded so officers can ‘be on the streets protecting us, not pushing paper’.

It comes after the Daily Mail revealed yesterday a historic agreement had been signed with all 43 police chiefs in England and Wales to send officers to every residential burglary.

Now the chairman of the National Police Chiefs’ Council Martin Hewitt wants to go even further, tearing up the bureaucratic process officers have to follow when a crime report comes in. 

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He told the Mail: ‘We want to see a review of crime recording processes. Complying with the process is an industry in policing that takes officers away from neighbourhood policing.

The Home Secretary signalled a major shake-up in the way burglary is treated by the police yesterday after force chiefs agreed to send an officer to every home raid

The Home Secretary signalled a major shake-up in the way burglary is treated by the police yesterday after force chiefs agreed to send an officer to every home raid

‘Right now, for crime recording purposes, a burglary of someone’s family home is treated the same as the loss of a spade from a shed. There must be a better way.’

Chairman of the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners Marc Jones also called for reform: ‘We strongly support the view that the way in which crime is recorded must be reviewed.

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‘We must be transparent with the public and ensure the statistics reflect the true nature of crime occurring in our neighbourhoods.’

Yesterday the Home Secretary said she would consider such changes. ‘A burglary in your home is a violation of what should be your safe space,’ she said. 

Suella Braverman said she would review the way burglary is recorded so officers can ‘be on the streets protecting us, not pushing paper’

Suella Braverman said she would review the way burglary is recorded so officers can ‘be on the streets protecting us, not pushing paper’

‘We must not get complacent about this kind of crime and, sadly, there is a perception that the police have been. 

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‘I wholeheartedly welcome the commitment from the National Police Chiefs’ Council to attend all home burglaries.’

She also said she would look at how burglaries are recorded ‘because I agree that police should be on the streets protecting us, not pushing paper’. 

She added: ‘But this is about getting the basics right. We are already recruiting thousands more police officers and have injected an extra £1.1billion into policing this year.

The chairman of the National Police Chiefs’ Council Martin Hewitt wants to go even further, tearing up the bureaucratic process officers have to follow when a crime report comes in

The chairman of the National Police Chiefs’ Council Martin Hewitt wants to go even further, tearing up the bureaucratic process officers have to follow when a crime report comes in

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‘Getting back to common-sense policing will increase the public’s confidence in their local force and sends a clear message to criminals this is a crime they won’t be getting away with.’ 

Police leaders are now due to have talks with the Home Secretary about how the commitment to attend residential burglaries will be funded.

Statistics show arrest rates almost doubling and offences halving in force areas where officers attend all burglaries.

Britain’s second-largest force, Greater Manchester, has seen a 95.8 per cent increase in arrests since officers started visiting victims’ homes last year. 

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In July last year it was one of the first forces to commit to attending every domestic burglary.

Arrests have rocketed from 430 suspects held in the year to July 2021 to 842 a year later.

Alan Pughsley, who leads Kent Police, set up a ‘chief constable’s squad’ to tackle burglars which has arrested 1,326 offenders in three years. 

He said: ‘Burglary is an exceptionally intrusive offence that causes significant distress to victims which is why we are committed to attending all reports of residential burglaries.’

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In Merseyside, a dedicated squad has been credited with reducing burglary rates by 55 per cent since 2018.

Deputy Chief Constable Ian Critchley said the force goes further than sending just an officer – a crime scene investigation specialist is also asked to attend each burglary.

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