Top psychiatrist who 'went to Cardiff Castle park for gay sex beaten and tortured' 1

Top psychiatrist who ‘went to Cardiff Castle park for gay sex beaten and tortured’

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A murdered psychiatrist was ‘beaten, tortured and left for dead’ by three people while looking for gay sex in a park near Cardiff Castle, a court heard today.

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Father-of-two Dr Gary Jenkins, 54, suffered horrific injuries when he was attacked as he went to the park to ‘explore his bisexuality’ after the break-up of his marriage. 

However, he was brutally set upon by three attackers, including a girl aged just 16, as they targeted his bag. 

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Opening the case on Tuesday, Dafydd Enoch, prosecuting, said the attack was ‘motivated by greed, homophobia and straight-up violence’.

He told the court the three defendants had been ‘in search of vulnerable gay men in the park for sex’ to rob. He said they set upon Dr Jenkins, who ‘pleaded for his life’.

Jason Edwards, 25, Lee William Strickland, 36, and the girl, who is now 17 but cannot be named for legal reasons, deny murder. They have pleaded guilty to manslaughter, robbery and assault occasioning actual bodily harm. 

Mr Enoch told the court how the trio laughed as they carried out the torture for some 15 minutes as Edwards said, ‘Stamp on his head, stamp on his head’. 

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The teenage girl was caught on CCTV saying ‘I needed that’ after the attack, jurors heard.  

Police rushed to the scene when the alarm was raised and found Dr Jenkins unconscious with his trousers pulled down. Mr Enoch added: ‘He had been left in a humiliating state.’

Doctors tried to save Mr Jenkins but he died of an ‘unsurvivable’ brain injury 16 days later. 

The court heard a witness described the teenage girl attacker as ‘f***ing evil. Sadistic.’ 

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Dr Gary Jenkins (pictured), 54, suffered horrific injuries when he was brutally attacked in the shadow of Cardiff Castle in Bute Park, Cardiff, on July 20 last year

Dr Gary Jenkins (pictured), 54, suffered horrific injuries when he was brutally attacked in the shadow of Cardiff Castle in Bute Park, Cardiff, on July 20 last year

Pictured: Lee Strickland, charged with the murder of Mr Jenkins

Pictured: Lee Strickland, charged with the murder of Mr Jenkins 

Mr Enoch said: ‘They were hurting Dr Jenkins for the best part of 15 minutes as he lay on the ground. It was torture pure and simple.

‘Edwards says, ‘Stamp on his head, stamp on his head’. There’s homophobic abuse [The youth] at the end is heard saying, ‘Yes, I needed that’. These defendants were indulging in sport.’

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Passer-by Louis Williams had been in the park when he spotted Dr Jenkins on the floor being kicked. He went to help Dr Jenkins but was also assaulted. Mr Williams described the attackers ‘egging each other on’ while laughing during the attack.

He told police: ‘I don’t know why they were hurting him so much.’

The court heard Mr Williams said the teenage girl was ‘confident’ and said she thought ‘everything she was doing was just funny.’

He told police: ‘She clearly was no victim. She’s f***ing evil. Sadistic.’

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The prosecutor said Dr Jenkins’ activities would ‘be his undoing’ after he left himself ‘particularly vulnerable.’

He said: ‘He was open about it and his colleagues were well aware of his bisexuality. Dr Jenkins was in the habit of attending Bute Park at night looking for sexual contact with likeminded men. He would often drink heavily as well.’ 

The court heard Mr Williams saw the three ‘shouting at Dr Jenkins and kicking him’ as they pulled at his bag.

The teenage girl, who was 16 at the time of the attack, was then heard yelling: ‘Take his bag. Get his bag.’

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Mr Enoch said: ‘They were hurting Dr Jenkins for the best part of 15 minutes as he lay on the ground. It was torture pure and simple.’

Victim Mr Williams, who was also assaulted, described the three ‘egging each other on’ while laughing during the attack.

He told police: ‘I don’t know why they were hurting him so much.’

The court heard Mr Williams said the teenage girl was ‘confident’ and said she thought ‘everything she was doing was just funny.’

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He told police: ‘She clearly was no victim. She’s f***ing evil. Sadistic.’

Mr Enoch said: ‘We ask you not to make the mistake in this case of assuming that 16-year-old was some sort of wilting flower caught up in something that was not of her making.

‘The reality was a million miles from that scenario.’

Officers were called to the scene after another man in the park heard shouting that became ‘angrier and angrier’ just after 1am.

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The man had previously been approached by the three defendants near to the Summerhouse cafe in the park.

He had noticed that the teenage girl ‘seemed completely sober’ while the two men appeared ‘under the influence of drink or drugs.’ 

Prosecutor Mr Enoch said: ‘We like to think as human beings we do protect each other.

‘Sadly the man at the centre of this case encountered the worst traits of humankind and despite the efforts of at least one person could not find protection.

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Jason Edwards (pictured), 25, Lee William Strickland, 36, and a 17-year-old girl, who cannot be named for legal reasons, have been charged with Mr Jenkins's murder

Jason Edwards (pictured), 25, Lee William Strickland, 36, and a 17-year-old girl, who cannot be named for legal reasons, have been charged with Mr Jenkins’s murder

Mr Enoch told the jury that Dr Gary Jenkins was a consultant psychiatrist living and working in Cardiff.

He said: ‘On July 20 last year in the early hours of the morning he was in Bute Park in Cardiff where he was viciously beaten, robbed, tortured and left for dead by these three defendants.

‘It was a beating apparently motivated by greed, homophobia and a straightforward liking of violence.’

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Merthyr Tydfil Crown Court heard Dr Jenkins was rushed to the University Hospital of Wales in the city after a witness tried to stop the attack.

Doctors tried to save Mr Jenkins but he died of an ‘unsurvivable’ brain injury 16 days later.

The court heard Dr Jenkins had met his wife at med school in London before the pair had two daughters together.

But he moved back to Cardiff following the breakdown of his marriage and went on to explore his bisexuality.

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He added: ‘He was a very easy target as he wandered about Bute Park. By it’s very nature the activity he engaged in was risky.’ 

Dr Jenkins was confronted by a ‘lethal powder keg’ of the three killers mixing together in the park – and he was described as ‘extraordinarily unthreatening’ by a fellow psychiatrist.

Prosecutor Dafydd Enoch said: ‘It’s difficult to fathom the depths to which we can sink but the unlikely combination of these three defendants produced a lethal powder keg which sadly for Dr Jenkins detonated right in front of him.

‘He didn’t deserve what happened to him – he was a much-loved and admired individual.

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‘Not one scintilla of remorse has been shown by any of these defendants who were prepared to leave him for dead on his own in the park.’

His line manager consultant psychiatrist Paul Cantrell described him as ‘extraordinarily unthreatening’ – and very well liked.

He said: ‘Gary presented in a camp and highly-strung figure sometimes associated with homosexuality and bisexuality.

‘There was something extraordinarily unthreatening about Gary which made him well-liked by all those who came across him. He had a wide circle of friends within the field in which we worked.

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‘Gary was a very good doctor and very passionate about his job. He was one of those doctors who always went the extra mile for patients.’

‘He was in regular contact with his children and a devoted father to his girls and he would go to London to see them. I understand his wife and children remained in London where he lived his marital and professional life but moved back to Cardiff six years ago.

‘Part of this estrangement may have been due to his bisexuality.

‘He felt a duty to his father who developed dementia and recently passed away.

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‘Gary was great fun when he was out – he was always the first to arrive at a party.

‘I was aware from colleagues he frequented Bute Park after hours. The impression conveyed to me by colleagues was well-known that he had occasion to attend the park late at night and knew him well enough to know it was to find a male partner. We were worried about these practises and were thinking of warning him.

‘He would go out and drink copious amounts of alcohol but he appeared to me a fit and healthy person, walked a lot, and was proud of his appearance.

‘He had no financial difficulties and was renegotiating his contract with me. He was looking to drop working hours by half.’

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The court heard Dr Jenkins had left work at 5pm before going for a meal and a glass of wine.

He was later spotted on CCTV at an Esso garage buying cigarettes and alcohol before last being seen at 9pm near to the park.

The court heard the alleged attackers positioned themselves in the park ‘to target somebody for robbery and violence.’

Dr Jenkins, who had been carrying a bag, was then subjected to the brutal robbery.

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The trial, due to last four weeks, continues.

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