William Tyrrell detectives conducting fresh round of interviews 1

William Tyrrell detectives conducting fresh round of interviews

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William Tyrrell detectives are conducting a fresh round of interviews in the case of the missing toddler as inquest findings are delayed with ‘no set date’ yet to resume.

 The inquest was meant to wind up in March, but was postponed by the sudden ‘high intensity’ dig for William’s remains near the NSW Mid North Coast town of Kendall which wound up before Christmas. 

A mystery bone fragment is still being examined by the State Forensic and Analytical Science Service laboratory (FASS) at Lidcombe in Sydney, along with strips of degraded cloth unearthed in bushland. 

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Forensic scientists are still analysing evidence from the Mazda hatchback seized last November that had been driven by William’s foster mother on the morning he vanished.

A court has heard that the foster mother will make an application in February to have her case heard under the NSW Mental Health Act, and the foster father was waiting on a report to decide if he will do the same.

Magistrate Robyn Denes slapped an unprecedented round of suppression orders on the case which forbid identifying the foster parents, their relatives, foster children and any evidence about the alleged assault until the forthcoming court case or the inquest have been ‘fully determined’.

Both the foster mother and the foster father have entered pleas of not guilty to the charge. 

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Detectives are conducting a fresh round of interviews in the case of missing toddler William Tyrrell, while the inquest into his disappearance is on hold with no set date to resume

Detectives are conducting a fresh round of interviews in the case of missing toddler William Tyrrell, while the inquest into his disappearance is on hold with no set date to resume

Detective Sean Ogilvy (above, at Hornsby Local Court last year) has been involved in investigating William's foster parents, as well as working on the bushland dig for the toddler's body

Detective Sean Ogilvy (above, at Hornsby Local Court last year) has been involved in investigating William’s foster parents, as well as working on the bushland dig for the toddler’s body

Forensic scientists are still analysing evidence from the Mazda hatchback (above) seized last November that had been driven by William's foster mother on the morning he vanished

Forensic scientists are still analysing evidence from the Mazda hatchback (above) seized last November that had been driven by William’s foster mother on the morning he vanished

Prosecutor Senior Sergeant Amin Assaad told Hornsby Local Court in December that the alleged child victim who police claim was assaulted by William’s foster parents would be re-interviewed before the police brief was served on February 1. 

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The ­renewed search for the toddler’s remains around the Kendall home where William was last photographed playing on his foster grandmother’s verandah on September 12, 2014 took place over four weeks. 

The inquest was suddenly halted last November when Strike Force Rosann announced it would search the home and one square kilometre of bushland around 700m from the premises.

Police hierarchy announced it was now  focusing on the foster mother as a person of interest in the case.

It is not suggested that the foster mother was actually involved in William’s disappearance, only that she has been identified as a person of interest.

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The car under forensic analysis, was owned by William’s foster grandmother and driven by the foster mother along Batar Creek, Road Kendall, around which police excavations centred in November and December.  

The $1 million reward for information that leads to the recovery of William Tyrrell, and the circumstances surrounding his disappearance, remains in place.

William's foster mother (above) has pleaded not guilty to the alleged assault of a child, who prosecutors were re-interviewing ahead of the matter returning to court next month

William’s foster mother (above) has pleaded not guilty to the alleged assault of a child, who prosecutors were re-interviewing ahead of the matter returning to court next month

The foster father (above) has also pleaded not guilty and will indicate if he, like the foster mother, intends to apply to have his case heard under the NSW Mental Health Act

The foster father (above) has also pleaded not guilty and will indicate if he, like the foster mother, intends to apply to have his case heard under the NSW Mental Health Act

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The ‘body finder’ forensic expert who unearthed remains of murdered schoolboy Daniel Morcombe lingered at William Tyrrell dig site until its very last day of operation, December 17.

Two days earlier a mystery bone fragment was found in situ and sent off for analysis, without police confirming if the bone was animal or human.

Professor Jon Olley remained at the site with Detective Sean Ogilvy, who has been investigating William Tyrrell’s foster parents.

William Tyrrell child advocate Allanna Smith told Daily Mail Australia she was ‘disappointed’ the search had to be halted and she slammed ‘seven years of secrets and lies’ marring the discovery of what really happened to the missing toddler. 

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Body finder expert Professor John Olley (above) lingered at the Tyrrell dig on its penultimate day last December (above, a day after a mystery bone fragment was found

Body finder expert Professor John Olley (above) lingered at the Tyrrell dig on its penultimate day last December (above, a day after a mystery bone fragment was found

Detective Sean Ogilvy (second left) at the search site with police and Prof Olley (right) last December 16, the day before the dig was wound up

Detective Sean Ogilvy (second left) at the search site with police and Prof Olley (right) last December 16, the day before the dig was wound up

Prof. Olley (right) with police as an excavator continued to work on the dig along Batar Creek Road at Kendall on December 16, a day after a mystery bone fragment was found

Prof. Olley (right) with police as an excavator continued to work on the dig along Batar Creek Road at Kendall on December 16, a day after a mystery bone fragment was found

 ‘I’m disappointed the search for William at Kendall stopped,’ Ms Smith said.

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‘The fact he was a foster child played a massive part in why it was never investigated as it should have been.

‘If William is dead … why is there suppressions on reporting what actually happened?’

In 2016 Ms Smith fought a legal battle against the then Family and Community Services (FACS) Department backed by Mr Jubelin and the foster parents .

NSW Supreme Court Justice Paul Brereton ruled William’s disappearance ‘while he was in the parental responsibility of the minister, and in the care of departmentally approved carers’ was a matter of legitimate public interest.    

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Child advocate Allanna Smith slammed the lack of resolution in the case, blaming 'seven years of secrets and lies' which she said had interfered with the search for William

Child advocate Allanna Smith slammed the lack of resolution in the case, blaming ‘seven years of secrets and lies’ which she said had interfered with the search for William

More than 30 items unearthed and tonnes of soil are being inspected at the FASS laboratory at Lidcombe.

Prof Olley told Daily Mail Australia onsite the task of finding William’s remains was ‘more complex’ than his successful discovery of Daniel Morcombe’s remains because it was over ‘a bigger area’.

He said that the Spider-Man costume could be the only clue remaining, given the make-up of the material.

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‘The one thing we have going in our favour is the fact that (investigators) believe he was in a polyester suit. That doesn’t break down and it’s very resistant to actually fading as well,’ he said. 

Kendall locals and residents of Benaroon Drive (above) from where William vanished want police to return and the answers to the toddler's disappearance sorted once and for all

Kendall locals and residents of Benaroon Drive (above) from where William vanished want police to return and the answers to the toddler’s disappearance sorted once and for all

 ‘There possibly would be bones, but given the level of bioactivity here, and the amount of humic acids that are in the soils, that would actually help break them down over time.’

William’s 56-year-old foster mother is due to apply for a hearing under the Mental Health Act in either Hornsby or Parramatta local courts on February 22.

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