World’s skinniest skyscraper ready to welcome its first residents to Manhattan’s Billionaire’s Row

World's skinniest skyscraper ready to welcome its first residents to Manhattan's Billionaire's Row 2
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The world’s skinniest skyscraper is ready to throw open its doors to customers with fat wallets after squeezing itself into the ever-spiking New York City skyline.

The 84-story Steinway Tower, or 111 West 57th Street, sits on Billionaires’ Row in midtown Manhattan at approximately 1,428 feet tall – but just 57 feet wide.

The luxury building has a height-to-width ratio of 24:1, developers confirmed to CNN Style, making it both the ‘most slender skyscraper in the world’ and one of the tallest buildings in the Western hemisphere.

Steinway Tower falls only a few feet short of being the tallest residential tower in the world, edged out by next-door neighbor Central Park Tower, which stands at 1,550 feet. Manhattan’s own One World Trade Center at 1,776 feet is the city’s tallest building.

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The newly finished development, which overlooks Central Park, features 60 apartments – starting at $7.75million for a studio unit. The penthouse apartment is listed for $66million. 

World's skinniest skyscraper ready to welcome its first residents to Manhattan's Billionaire's Row 3

Steinway Tower, the world’s skinniest skyscraper, is standing tall amid the New York City skyline and ready to welcome residents to its multi-million dollar luxury apartments

The $66 million penthouse apartment features 360-degree panoramic views of the city, including onto Central Park

The $66 million penthouse apartment features 360-degree panoramic views of the city, including onto Central Park

The building's first five floors are home to high-end retailers and recreation spaces, including an 82-foot swimming pool, private dining room and a double-height fitness center with a terrace. Amenities also include a common area outdoor space, 24-hour doorman and a concierge service

The building’s first five floors are home to high-end retailers and recreation spaces, including an 82-foot swimming pool, private dining room and a double-height fitness center with a terrace. Amenities also include a common area outdoor space, 24-hour doorman and a concierge service

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Steinway Tower has a height-to-width ratio of 24:1, making it both the 'most slender skyscraper in the world' and one of the tallest buildings in the Western hemisphere

Steinway Tower has a height-to-width ratio of 24:1, making it both the ‘most slender skyscraper in the world’ and one of the tallest buildings in the Western hemisphere

The luxury building has a height-to-width ratio of 24:1, making it both the 'most slender skyscraper in the world' and one of the tallest buildings in the Western hemisphere

The luxury building has a height-to-width ratio of 24:1, making it both the ‘most slender skyscraper in the world’ and one of the tallest buildings in the Western hemisphere

Steinway Tower was designed to be ‘a project of extraordinary proportions and epic grandeur,’ developers told the news outlet. 

‘Any preconceived notions that our team had about skyscrapers of New York City developments were replaced with an opportunity to do something that had never been done before,’ Gregg Pasquarelli, principal at SHoP Architects, said. 

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The architects sought to make a powerful statement with the building, having it elegantly taper from its tip, which houses a triplex penthouse apartment. 

The building’s east and west faces feature terracotta tiles with bronze accents, as depicted in images captured by architectural photographer Evan Joseph. Glass curtains clad its north and south walls which face Central Park and lower Manhattan, respectively. 

The design team’s main goal was to create a ‘new and bold interpretation’ of New York’s skyline while also memorializing the area’s historic roots. 

They drew inspiration from ‘the golden age of the Manhattan skyscraper’ and the city’s Art Deco history.

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Steinway Tower is an addition to adjacent Steinway Hall, once a cultural hub in Manhattan.

The landmarked Steinway Hall, constructed in 1925, served as a concert hall and the former headquarters of piano maker Steinway and Sons. The venue has since been converted into luxury residences which now connect to the super-tall, slender tower.

Steinway Tower construction began in 2013 and was completed in 2021. Residents are just now able to move into the complex. 

The east and west faces feature terracotta tiles with bronze accents that seemingly change colors as the sun moves around the building

The east and west faces feature terracotta tiles with bronze accents that seemingly change colors as the sun moves around the building

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Construction on Steinway Tower (center) began in 2013 and was completed in 2021. Residents are just now able to move into the complex

Construction on Steinway Tower (center) began in 2013 and was completed in 2021. Residents are just now able to move into the complex

Steinway Hall: Center of the piano universe

German-American piano company Steinway & Sons was founded in New York City in 1853 by German piano builder Heinrich Engelhard Steinweg.

The company, which has factories in both New York City and Hamburg, Germany, has been manufacturing and showcasing pianos in the city – and around the world – ever since.

Steinway & Sons opened their piano showroom at Steinway Hall, once known as the ‘center of the piano universe,’ on West 57th Street in 1925.

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The building, designed by the architects responsible for Grand Central Terminal, sat across from Carnegie Hall.

The building – which featured a reception room, salesrooms, and a recital hall seating 240, as well as executive offices and music studios – served as a beacon in the art world. Some of the greatest known pianists in the world performed at the facility. 

Steinway & Sons sold the location in 2015, resulting in the development of the luxury apartment complex that several Manhattan residents now call home. 

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The 84-story building features 82 floors, 77 of which offer luxury housing. There is only one residence per floor.

The building’s first five floors are home to high-end retailers and recreation spaces, including an 82-foot swimming pool, private dining room and a double-height fitness center with a terrace. 

Amenities also include a common area outdoor space, 24-hour doorman and a concierge service.

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The building’s interior was designed by Studio Sofield, in an attempt to highlight the grandeur of the complex. 

The tower’s most expensive unit, the Triplex Park Loggia Penthouse 72, features an indoor-outdoor living space spanning across three full floors, all of which offer an unobstructed 360-degree view of Manhattan.

The four-bedroom, five-and-a-half-bathroom condo has 7,130 square feet of interior space on three floors and a 1,397 square foot loggia, according to the property listing

In heightened drama, the unit is designed around a  central entrance gallery clad with white macauba stone floors and an oval staircase connecting the upper and lower levels. It also has a private elevator.

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The unit’s great hall features floor-to-ceiling windows facing Central Park, 14-foot-tall ceilings and a wet bar.

The formal dining room faces south with floor-to-ceiling windows offering views of downtown Manhattan. The unit also has a separate eat-in kitchen and a library.

The master bedroom faces Central Park and features dual windowed bathrooms, walk-in closets and a separate sitting room.

One of the suite’s bathrooms is clad in white onyx and includes a handmade nickel bathtub by British designer William Holland. The suite’s second bathroom is finished in grey onyx with custom fixtures in blackened steel and glass. 

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The 84-story building (center) joins the rising spires along Central Park's Billionaire's Row

The 84-story building (center) joins the rising spires along Central Park’s Billionaire’s Row

The penthouse has already been scooped up by an international buyer who only toured the unit virtually and signed for it less than a month later.

In 2019, when the building was still under construction, Business Insider toured a three-bedroom unit on the 43rd floor.

The unit, about halfway up the building, had its own private elevator entrance and featured about 4,500 square feet of living space. 

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The great room spanned approximately 50 feet long and sat opposite the dining room, which Warren said could comfortably fit 10 people and featured a full wet bar.

The apartment had an open-concept design, with the kitchen flowing seamlessly into the living area. 

Each bedroom had floor-to-ceiling windows and its own en suite bathroom.

In addition to its marble-clad bathroom with dual vanities and a rain shower, the master suite featured a walk-in dressing room.

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The building offers 60 luxury apartments valued from $7.75M for a studio to $66M for the penthouse overlooking Central Park

The building offers 60 luxury apartments valued from $7.75M for a studio to $66M for the penthouse overlooking Central Park

Steinway Tower was designed to be 'a project of extraordinary proportions and epic grandeur,' developers claim

Steinway Tower was designed to be ‘a project of extraordinary proportions and epic grandeur,’ developers claim

The building's east and west faces feature terracotta tiles with bronze accents. Glass curtains clad its north and south walls which face Central Park and lower Manhattan, respectively

The building’s east and west faces feature terracotta tiles with bronze accents. Glass curtains clad its north and south walls which face Central Park and lower Manhattan, respectively

The skyscraper is an imposing addition to the Manhattan skyline and of Billionaire's Row that runs along 57th Street

The skyscraper is an imposing addition to the Manhattan skyline and of Billionaire’s Row that runs along 57th Street 

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The sun sets on Central Park Tower and the Steinway Tower on Billionaires' Row, Hudson Yards and One and Two Manhattan West in New York City along with Hoboken, New Jersey, as seen from Jersey City, New Jersey

The sun sets on Central Park Tower and the Steinway Tower on Billionaires’ Row, Hudson Yards and One and Two Manhattan West in New York City along with Hoboken, New Jersey, as seen from Jersey City, New Jersey

A vertical view of Manhattan's westside, featuring the Steinway Tower and Central Park Tower at sunset

A vertical view of Manhattan’s westside, featuring the Steinway Tower and Central Park Tower at sunset

The tower stands out, silhouetted against the sky at sunset

The tower stands out, silhouetted against the sky at sunset

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