Remote Queensland town welcomes first baby in 15 YEARS – as dad makes a mad 200km dash to be there

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Remote outback town welcomes its first baby in 15 YEARS – as dad makes a mad 280km dash from a cattle mustering camp to be there for the birth

  • Farmer’s partner, Jess Harvey, went into labour 500km from Townsville hospital
  • Royal Flying Doctor Service flew team to tiny Richmond to help her give birth
  • Dad Sam Mcgrath drove 280km on dirt roads for town’s first birth in 15 years
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An outback Australian town cheered as it celebrated its first baby in 15 years, with the farmer dad just making his son’s birth after an epic trip across Queensland.

Young mum Jessie Harvey gave birth to Darby in Richmond hospital in outback Queensland just after her partner Sam Mcgrath battled flooded dirt roads to drive in from a remote mustering camp.

‘I did make the hospital in time, [Darby] waited for me,’ Mr Mcgrath, who manages a 600,000 acre remote cattle station at East Creek, Woodstock, told Daily Mail Australia.

Young mum Jessie Harvey gave birth to Darby in outback Queensland just after her partner Sam Mcgrath battled flooded dirt roads to drive in from a remote mustering camp

Young mum Jessie Harvey gave birth to Darby in outback Queensland just after her partner Sam Mcgrath battled flooded dirt roads to drive in from a remote mustering camp

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An outback Australian town cheered as it celebrated its first baby in 15 years, with the farmer dad just making his son's birth after an epic trip across Queensland

An outback Australian town cheered as it celebrated its first baby in 15 years, with the farmer dad just making his son’s birth after an epic trip across Queensland

With her partner away and going into labour at 3am, Ms Harvey, just 22, was in tears.

‘I called my mum and just cried; this wasn’t how I planned it,’ she said. 

The return trip to the nearest hospital for Ms Harvey to have regular check-ups is 1,460km at Townsville.

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Their only option was tiny Richmond hospital, which had no midwives and doesn’t do births. 

Ms Mcgrath said his son Darby is 'kicking goals' after his dramatic birth

Ms Mcgrath said his son Darby is ‘kicking goals’ after his dramatic birth

Sam Mcgrath (left) said hospital staff were cheering when their baby (Darby) was born as it was the first child delivered there in 15 years. Mum Jessie Harvey and Darby are pictured with Sam

Sam Mcgrath (left) said hospital staff were cheering when their baby (Darby) was born as it was the first child delivered there in 15 years. Mum Jessie Harvey and Darby are pictured with Sam 

Hospital staff held their collective breaths until little Darby first cried. 

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‘It was honestly amazing everyone was so stoked, so happy to see a child being born [at Richmond],’ Mr Mcgrath, 27, said.

‘It was pretty well a cheering vibe, everyone was quite ecstatic.’

Richmond has a population of 648 people and because the hospital had no midwives on duty, the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) had to fly in a team to deliver Darby.

‘Jess was an absolute trooper, Sam was there to support and cut the cord, our flight nurse Leanne Ashbacher was incredible, and even our pilot got involved,’ said RFDS doctor Shima Ghedia.

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The RFDS then flew the family to Townsville for further care.

Mr Mcgrath said he ‘just sat down for breakfast’ while mustering when he got the call that his partner was going into labour.

‘I had just taken a sip out of my coffee when I got the call. I grabbed my bag and chucked it on the ute then had to high-tail it into town. 

Ms Harvey said she cried when she went into labour at 3am without her partner Sam there

Ms Harvey said she cried when she went into labour at 3am without her partner Sam there

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Richmond has a population of 648 people and because the hospital had no midwives on duty, the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) had to fly in a team to deliver Darby

Richmond has a population of 648 people and because the hospital had no midwives on duty, the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) had to fly in a team to deliver Darby

‘Jess had woken up at 3am with pains and told the cook. They said she was 8cm dilated and they could feel the head but from there I had 280km to go, including over 100km of dirt road.

‘I don’t want to say how fast I had to go to get there in time because I might get in trouble but I made it.’

On the way home from the hospital heavy rain and flooding meant the young parents couldn’t get home. 

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Instead they were forced to shelter for the night at a friend’s property.

Mr Mcgrath said little Darby is doing well and ‘kicking all the goals he needs to’.

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