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New York family tricked man into stealing $4 million from his boss to save woman from mobsters

New York family tricked man into stealing $4 million from his boss to save woman from mobsters 2

A New York couple was sentenced to prison on Tuesday for tricking a man into stealing $4 million from his boss in order to save a woman he believed was in trouble with the mob. 

Candy Evans, 52, and her husband, Archie Kaslov, 55, were sentenced to 12 months and 30 months in prison, respectively, for masterminding a plot that prosecutors said included their whole family to finance their expensive spending habits that included a $300,000 Rolls Royce Phantom Drophead, Rolex watches and thousands in jewelry, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. 

The DOJ claimed the couple had their sons, Tony John Evans, 33, Corry Blue Evans, 29, and Robert Evans, 34, pretend to be mobsters who were threatening a New York woman that the victim, from Maryland, had met online.

When Evans caught on to the investigation against her family in 2017, prosecutors claim she went into damage control, instructing family members to lie to the FBI, directing Robert’s ex-wife to marry the New York woman so neither of them could testify, and having the women write confessions to try and exonerate the family. 

Candy Evans, 52, and her husband, Archie Kaslov, 55, were sentenced to 12 months and 30 months in prison, respectively, for masterminding a plot that prosecutors said included their whole family to finance their expensive spending habits that included a $300,000 Rolls Royce Phantom Drophead (pictured) in 2017

Candy Evans, 52, and her husband, Archie Kaslov, 55, were sentenced to 12 months and 30 months in prison, respectively, for masterminding a plot that prosecutors said included their whole family to finance their expensive spending habits that included a $300,000 Rolls Royce Phantom Drophead (pictured) in 2017 

The DOJ said the scheme began in early 2017, when the victim got in touch with the unnamed New York woman on the classified site Backpage, which was shutdown for running ads for prostitution. 

The woman and the sons allegedly tricked the man into believing she needed to pay off debts to the mob, leading the victim to steal $4 million from his Washington D.C. employer between January and March 2017. 

‘He converted the funds to cash and gold bars and delivered the money and gold bars to New York drop-off locations, including a hotel room, believing the funds were going to mobsters to whom the New York woman owed money,’ the DOJ said in a statement. ‘In reality, all of the funds he embezzled and delivered to New York went to members of the Evans-Kaslov family.’   

Kaslov, who pleaded guilty in 2020 to conspiracy to commit wire fraud, admitted he personally converted at least $2 million in gold bars to cash and drove his family around New York City’s Diamond District to buy Rolex watches and spend tens of thousands of dollars on jewelry. 

In May 2017, Kaslov had also traveled to Texas to purchase a Rolls Royce Phantom Drophead luxury vehicle for $300,000 cash, which he later sold at a New Jersey dealership for $120,000 following his guilty plea. 

While Kaslov appeared to be leading the expensive purchases that tipped off investigators, prosecutors said it was the matriarch who was in control of the attempt to cover up the family’s crimes. 

Evans, who pleaded guilty to tampering with a witness by corrupt persuasion or misleading conduct in 2020, allegedly began selling out family members in October 2017, when she learned her family was under investigation by the FBI. 

Two days after the agents searched the family member’s homes that fall, prosecutors said Evans called one of the agents to tell them that her son Tony, Robert’s ex-wife, Gina Russell, and the New York woman were the masterminds behind the scheme. 

She later admitted that she lied when she claimed she, Kaslov and her two other sons were innocent. 

As the FBI began interviewing the family members, prosecutors said Evans had instructed her family to lie and concocted a plan to have Russell marry the New York woman, believing that spouses could not testify against each other in court. 

Evans also directed Russell and the New York woman to sign handwritten, notarized confessions to the scheme and counseling the New York woman to lie to FBI agents that the scheme never existed and was a story made up by the victim, according to the DOJ. 

Along with their respective sentence, Evans and Kaslov will be remanded to supervised release for three years and pay back the swindled funds. Kaslov was ordered to pay an additional $1 million in a forfeiture money judgment. 

Tony had pleaded guilty to interference with interstate commerce by extortion in September 2018, where he was sentenced to five years in prison for his role in the scheme. 

Robert and Russell have also pleaded guilty to the same extortion charge in 2021 and 2019, respectively, and are currently awaiting sentencing.  

The youngest son, Corry, maintains his innocence and has pleaded not guilty to the extortion charges filed against him. 

The DOJ did not say whether the New York woman faces charges for her role in the extortion scheme or if she remains married to Russell.  

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