Paul McKenna hosts mass online hypnosis to convert Britain's 15 million sprout haters to lovers 1

Paul McKenna hosts mass online hypnosis to convert Britain’s 15 million sprout haters to lovers

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Paul McKenna is hosting the world’s first mass online hypnosis to convert Britain’s 15 million sprout haters to lovers of the vegetable this Christmas.

The renowned hypnotist has created a groundbreaking video as research reveals almost a quarter (23 per cent) of Britons can’t stand Brussels Sprouts.

The ten minute ‘Save Our Sprouts’ trance works by encouraging viewers to imagine something they love eating while also thinking about the vegetable.

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The hypnosis has already been tested successfully on several sprout-hating members of the public.

Renowned hypnotist Paul McKenna (pictured) has created a groundbreaking video as research reveals almost a quarter (23 per cent) of Britons can't stand Brussels Sprouts

Renowned hypnotist Paul McKenna (pictured) has created a groundbreaking video as research reveals almost a quarter (23 per cent) of Britons can’t stand Brussels Sprouts

It was rolled out to the nation on supermarket Aldi’s YouTube channel, just in time to help sprouts haters up and down the country ahead of the Big Day.

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It’s hoped the new video will save 130 million of the vegetable from ending up in landfill this festive season.

The 58 year old behavioural scientist said: ‘I was excited at the prospect of being part of a fun, festive project, with a good cause at its heart.

‘This sprouts hypnosis is all about increasing food choices for Brits over Christmas, at a time that is all about enjoyment.

‘Not only are sprouts an essential part of Christmas day, but they are also a great source of vitamins and minerals.

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‘Here’s to coming together as a nation to keep them on our Christmas dinner plates for good.’

Two sprout haters vouched for McKenna’s methods after he worked his spell on them.

Christmas dinner items in order of Brits’ preference

1. Roast potatoes

2. Turkey

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3. Yorkshire puddings

4. Stuffing

5. Pigs in Blankets

6. Parsnips

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7. Carrots

8. Sprouts

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By asking that they imagine the texture and taste of their favourite food when eating brussels sprouts, he was able to refocus their brains to let go of previous negative thoughts towards the vegetable.

After the session, which took approximately 15 minutes, both had been converted into sprout lovers – and even went back for seconds.

Scott Garson, a 29 year old finance manager from Clapham, London, said: ‘I’m shocked. I think the most surprising outcome of this experiment is that after eating one sprout, I went in for another.

‘I never thought that I would like them, let alone want more! I just hope it lasts and it’s a Merry Sproutmas.’

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Enoch Ogbonnaya, a student from Charlton, London, said: ‘The flavour has changed*I don’t know how, but it has.

‘My mum is going to be absolutely shocked, and she’s going to be buzzing. Now, when she puts brussel sprouts on the plate, I’ll ask for seconds.’

In a bid to boost the nation’s love of sprouts, Aldi has also created a collection of alternative recipes to boiling and roasting, such as the ‘Unbel-leaf-able Sprout Cupcakes’ and ‘Bloody Sprout-Mary’.

Research by Aldi has revealed amongst 18 to 24 year olds, the hatred is higher than nationally with 41 per cent of Gen-Z not liking the classic Christmas vegetable.

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Pictured: A frying pan with roasted brussel sprouts on wooden table (File image)

Pictured: A frying pan with roasted brussel sprouts on wooden table (File image)

It was ranked the least favourite component of the dinner plate on the Big Day – with roast potatoes followed by turkey coming out on top.

Parsnips are Brits’ favourite out of the three Christmas vegetables.

The research of over 2,000 Brits found Bradford, West Yorkshire, is the biggest sprout hating city with 60 per cent of Bradfordians admitting they would rather not have them this year.

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One in ten (10 per cent) fear the hatred could see sprouts losing their place at the Christmas table for good.

Julie Ashfield, managing director of buying at Aldi UK, said: ‘Sprouts are a polarising vegetable that has the nation divided.

‘Not only will our online hypnosis help customers to enjoy every single element of their Christmas dinner, but it could also help to save millions of sprouts from being tossed in the bin.

‘We hope sprout haters up and down the country are encouraged to give the hypnosis a go.’

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