Rare 1965 Mini Cooper S that’s been in a SHED for 34 years se to fetch £32k at auction

Rare 1965 Mini Cooper S that's been in a SHED for 34 years se to fetch £32k at auction 2
Advertisement

When you find a car you fall in love with, it can be very difficult to part ways with it. And that appears to be the case with this ultra-rare Mini unearthed from a 30-year slumber before it heads to auction in September.

The timewarp 1965 Mk1 Mini Cooper S ‘1071’, finished in Almond Green paint, has been recovered from spending over three decades in a shed.

The vendor, now in his eighties, has owned the Mini since the year before England lifted the World Cup – and the fact it has not moved in over 30 years explains why it has fewer than 40,000 miles on the clock from new.

In the year it was produced, the Mini would have set customers back £778. When the hammer drops in a couple of months, experts believe it will go for 41 times as much.

Advertisement
Not what you'd usually find in a garden shed: This rare Morris Mini Cooper S '1071' has been kept in this shed on the outskirts of Kidderminster for 34 years. It goes to auction in September

Not what you’d usually find in a garden shed: This rare Morris Mini Cooper S ‘1071’ has been kept in this shed on the outskirts of Kidderminster for 34 years. It goes to auction in September

Classic Car Auctions, which will offer the dinky sixties icon to the highest bidder on 24 September at its sale at Warwickshire Event Centre, describes it as a ‘sleeping beauty’ after it was recently located in its three-decade-long hiding place.

It now expects a winning bid in the region of £28,000 to £32,000 when it goes to the block. 

The 1071cc MK1 Morris Cooper S was the performance version of the Mini produced by BMC (British Motor Corporation) that famously won the Monte Carlo Rally back in 1964 with Paddy Hopkirk – who died at the age of 89 this week – at the wheel. 

Advertisement

Only around 4,000 examples were produced with this engine between 1963 and the rally-winning year, with this 1965-registered example likely being one of the last models built.

Like all versions of the original Mini Cooper S, a 1071cc is a highly desirable car.

Some people commenting on this story below have questioned its Cooper S authenticity, pointing out that the car only has a single fuel tank. However, until 1965 a single fuel tank was standard on these models, with an additional tank an optional extra until dual tanks became a standard feature from 1966 onwards. 

This one’s rare green paint job – contrasted with a white roof – as well as the low mileage and fact it is a UK-supplied, right-hand drive car means it should sell for relatively big money later in the summer.

Advertisement
The elderly vendor acquired the car in 1965 from a BMC employee who had only just bought it that same year using the company's discount scheme for workers

The elderly vendor acquired the car in 1965 from a BMC employee who had only just bought it that same year using the company’s discount scheme for workers

That means it has one owner almost from new - and in over half a century the car has accumulated only 39,144 miles

That means it has one owner almost from new – and in over half a century the car has accumulated only 39,144 miles

How rare is it? Only around 4,000 examples were produced with the 1,071cc Cooper S engine between 1963 and the Monte Carlo rally-winning year of 1964

How rare is it? Only around 4,000 examples were produced with the 1,071cc Cooper S engine between 1963 and the Monte Carlo rally-winning year of 1964

Richard Greenhalgh who consigned the car for Classic Car Auctions, said the now-senior owner had chosen the compact British legend over a Jaguar sports car back in the sixties because he wanted to transport more passengers on trips. 

Advertisement

‘The vendor from near Kidderminster is in his 80s now,’ Richard explains.

‘Of course, when he bought the Mini Cooper it was quite a car in its day. 

‘He told me he could have had an E-Type Jaguar at the time but decided on the Cooper S ‘1071’ as he wanted to go on a trips with the car, with possibly two or three passengers and back then he felt the Cooper S was more practical than the E-Type.’

The car remains entirely original and retains the factory Dove Grey and Porcelain Green vinyl interior, which is complemented by Cumulous Grey carpets

The car remains entirely original and retains the factory Dove Grey and Porcelain Green vinyl interior, which is complemented by Cumulous Grey carpets

Advertisement
The Mini is a British icon, and the Mk1 Cooper S is the jewel of them all, which is why they are so desirable among collectors and classic car enthusiasts

The Mini is a British icon, and the Mk1 Cooper S is the jewel of them all, which is why they are so desirable among collectors and classic car enthusiasts 

The last MoT certificate with the car was issued in October 1986 at 39,031 miles, which means it has travelled just 113 miles in the last 36 years - based on today's odometer reading

The last MoT certificate with the car was issued in October 1986 at 39,031 miles, which means it has travelled just 113 miles in the last 36 years – based on today’s odometer reading

Morris Mini Cooper S ‘1071’ Mk1 specs

Rare 1965 Mini Cooper S that's been in a SHED for 34 years se to fetch £32k at auction 3

Production: 4,000 (approx)

Advertisement

Years built: 1963-1964

Price new: £778 

Engine: 1,071cc 4-cylinder petrol

Transmission: 4-speed manual

Advertisement

Maximum power: 70bhp @6,200rpm

Acceleration (0-60mph): 13.5secs 

Top speed: 90mph

Dimensions

Advertisement

Length: 3,054mm

Width: 1,397mm

Height: 1,346mm

Wheelbase:  2,038mm

Advertisement

The car remains entirely original and retains the factory Dove Grey and Porcelain Green vinyl interior, which is complemented by Cumulous Grey carpets.

Originally purchased by a BMC employee on a company discount scheme in 1965, it was bought by the vendor later that year.

Advertisement

That means it has been in single ownership almost from new, stretching some 56 years in which it has racked-up – a believed genuine – 39,144 miles.

The latest MoT certificate accompanying the car was issued in October 1986 at 39,031 miles, which means it has travelled just 113 miles in the last 36 years.

It also comes with its original British Motor Corporation ‘Passport to Service’ book and a tax disc with an expiry date of 31 March 1988.

The Mini hasn’t been used on the road since, meaning it has been in storage for a whopping 34 years.

Advertisement

All identification numbers are genuine, correct and original. 

The ‘DON 55C’ registration number is original too, Classic Car Auction confirms – and is likely worth a few thousand pounds on its own.

Given that it has been kept in a wooden shed for over three decades, the auction house says it has made no attempt made to start it.

The engine will need a very close inspection before it is turned over – though the chassis does roll freely when pushed.

Advertisement

In the auction house’s condition report, it scores a relatively poor 61 out of 135, with clear signs that it needs some TLC.

Apart from the interior, which appears in relatively good condition, the Mini’s exterior, engine and other mechanical components have been issued a two-out-of-five star rating throughout and even the original Cooper S 4.5J wheels will need some attention.

It is still displaying a tax disc with an expiry date of 31 March 1988. The Mini hasn't been used on the road since, meaning it has been in storage for a whopping 34 years

It is still displaying a tax disc with an expiry date of 31 March 1988. The Mini hasn’t been used on the road since, meaning it has been in storage for a whopping 34 years

Given that it has been kept in a wooden shed for over three decades, the auction house says there has been no attempt made to start it - though it does roll freely when pushed

Given that it has been kept in a wooden shed for over three decades, the auction house says there has been no attempt made to start it – though it does roll freely when pushed

Advertisement
The vendor, now in his eighties, told Classic Car Auctions that he chose the Mini Cooper S instead of a Jaguar E-Type in 1965 because he needed back seats to take passengers on trips

The vendor, now in his eighties, told Classic Car Auctions that he chose the Mini Cooper S instead of a Jaguar E-Type in 1965 because he needed back seats to take passengers on trips

While it might require some attention – and funds – to get it back to its sparking best, if restored to like-new condition the Mini could be worth up to £50,000, according to the latest valuation data held by classic car experts, Hagerty UK.

An example in good to excellent condition is worth between £24,000 and £37,000, but few still on the road today will have mileage as low as this one – and just two owners from new. 

A 1963 example, also finished in Almond Green with an Old English White roof, with just 33,000 miles on the clock – and in far better condition – was sold by Silverstone auctions in July 2020. It changed hands for £39,150, though collectible car values have been rising sharply in the last two years, even in light of the pandemic.

Advertisement

Classic Car Auctions recommends that interested collectors attend the September auction to view the car before registering a bid on the day of sale.

CARS & MOTORING: ON TEST

Advertisement

Some links in this article may be affiliate links. If you click on them we may earn a small commission. That helps us fund This Is Money, and keep it free to use. We do not write articles to promote products. We do not allow any commercial relationship to affect our editorial independence.

Advertisement