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Woman is stabbed in leg as she tries to stop phone theft at Manhattan subway station [Video]

Woman is stabbed in leg as she tries to stop phone theft at Manhattan subway station [Video] 2

Newly-released surveillance footage shows the moment a Good Samaritan who was trying to stop a thief from stealing another woman’s cellphone was stabbed in the leg.

The video, released by the New York Police Department on Wednesday, shows a 36-year-old female walking down the platform at the 34th Street Herald Square station on Monday shortly after 6pm, when a man with a lime green and black jacket could be seen kneeling down in an apparent attempt to pick something up from the ground.

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The woman, carrying a Macy’s shopping bag, looks over at the man who runs down the platform as a 33-year-old woman in a black jacket and gray backpack chases after him. Police say the suspect had knocked the phone out of the woman’s hand before the chase ensued.

The two women were able to corner the black man near a pole, the video shows, at which point the woman with the Macy’s bag reaches toward him leading to a quick struggle before he runs away.

As he is seen fleeing, the woman with the Macy’s bag could be seen hopping on her left leg, apparently injured.

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The woman – who has not been named – was later wheeled out of the station and taken to Bellevue hospital for a stab wound to her leg.

Meanwhile, the other woman continued to chase after the suspect, who remains on the loose. 

He is described as being in his 20s, and the NYPD are now offering a $3,500 reward for any information about his whereabouts as crime rates skyrocket in the Big Apple’s subway system.

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According to the New York Post, major felonies within the subway system rose a whopping 68 percent from the same time period last year, even as Mayor Eric Adams continues to add cops to patrol the platforms. 

A 36-year-old woman was captured on surveillance footage Monday walking down the platform at the 34th Street Herald Square station in Manhattan

A 36-year-old woman was captured on surveillance footage Monday walking down the platform at the 34th Street Herald Square station in Manhattan

Soon a man in a black and lime green jacket comes into view and is seen grabbing something from the ground - after police say he knocked a cellphone out of a 33-year-old woman's hands

Soon a man in a black and lime green jacket comes into view and is seen grabbing something from the ground – after police say he knocked a cellphone out of a 33-year-old woman’s hands

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A woman in a black jacket and a gray backpack starts chasing after the apparent thief

A woman in a black jacket and a gray backpack starts chasing after the apparent thief

The two women apparently corner him at a pole, at which point he allegedly stabs the 36-year-old woman

The two women apparently corner him at a pole, at which point he allegedly stabs the 36-year-old woman

The NYPD is now offering a $3,500 reward for any information about the suspect

The NYPD is now offering a $3,500 reward for any information about the suspect

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The statistics acquired by the New York Post show that crime rates in the city are only increasing – with robberies up 72 percent this year through April 10 and felony assaults increasing 28 percent with 169 attacks this year compared to 132 last year.

Rapes in the subway system have also doubled from two to four, and grand larcenies are up 110 percent, with to 275 incidents reported this year compared to just 131 last year.

The problem is not just isolated to the city’s subway system – though.

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According to recently-released NYPD statistics, crime citywide is up 43.37 percent over last year, with robberies increasing 48 percent, from 3,078 last year to more than  4,500 so far in 2022.

Grand larcenies are also up 54.9 percent compared to last year – with more than 13,900 incidents reported already, and grand larcenies from automobiles have jumped a whopping 71.4 percent -from 2,212 last year to 3,792 so far this year.   

Burglaries have also increased 31.6 percent, according to the data, and felony assaults jumped 21.2 percent – with 6,745 already reported this year, compared to 5,564 reported at the same time last year. 

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The apparent Good Samaritan - who has not been named- was wheeled out of the station by emergency medical workers

The apparent Good Samaritan – who has not been named- was wheeled out of the station by emergency medical workers

She was transported to Bellevue Hospital for a stab wound to her right leg

She was transported to Bellevue Hospital for a stab wound to her right leg

Woman is stabbed in leg as she tries to stop phone theft at Manhattan subway station [Video] 3

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Mayor Eric Adams had vowed to fight the city’s growing crime promise before he was elected last year, and has deployed 1,000 more officers to the subways to crack down on subway-related crime.  

But just about two weeks after he took office, on January 15, 40-year-old Michelle Go was pushed onto the subway tracks by a homeless man at the Times Square stop while she was looking down at her phone. 

She was struck by a train and pronounced dead at the scene by EMS personnel, while the suspect, 61-year-old Martial Simon, fled the scene.

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Manhattan Supreme Court officials announced on Tuesday that Simon, who was charged with second-degree murder in Go’s death, was ‘unfit’ to stand trial. He will likely now be sent to a mental health facility rather than go on trial for her death. 

Then just last week, the city made national headlines after a gunman opened fire at a Brooklyn subway stop.

Prosecutors say Frank James, 62, staged a premeditated attack when he shot ten people and injured others on the northbound N train at around 8.25am on April 12. 

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Videos from the scene showed hundreds of commuters frantically running for the exits as shots were fired. 

What ensued was a nearly 24-hour long manhunt for James, who was ultimately arrested while strolling down the street. 

James is now being held without bail as he faces federal charges for enacting terror.

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His motive for the attack remains unclear. 

Frantic commuters were seen trying to run for the exits after a gunman opened fire at a Brooklyn subway station last week

Frantic commuters were seen trying to run for the exits after a gunman opened fire at a Brooklyn subway station last week

One man was seen apparently injured in the shooting as officers and a Good Samaritan tried to help him on April 12

One man was seen apparently injured in the shooting as officers and a Good Samaritan tried to help him on April 12

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Frank James was arrested the next day after he was caught walking down the street

Frank James was arrested the next day after he was caught walking down the street

City officials have now deployed even more officers to the subways following the devastating attack last week, and over the weekend, Adams and Police Commissioner Keechant Sewell sought to reassure the public that the subways are safe.

During an appearance on MSNBC’s The Sunday Show with Jonathan Capehart, the mayor touted his transit safety plan.

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‘The transit system is the lifeblood of our city, and we have put in place what I believe are the foundational parts of having a real public-safety apparatus’ the mayor said, claiming the city is ‘far from’ the crime spree of the 1980s and 90s.

‘This city is far from spiraling out of control,’ Adams claimed, ‘and we hope to get crime under control and also deal with those pathways that lead to criminal behavior in our city.’

Sewell later promised ABC This Week host George Stephanopoulos in a joint appearance with the mayor: ‘The subways have to be safe, and they will be safe.

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‘We’re surging more officers into the subway system,’ she said, noting: ‘We recognize that people need to see a visible presence of police in the subway, and we’re endeavoring to make sure that happens.’ 

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